Showing our face to the world

One of the oddest things about being a writer today is the need to post, blog, publicize and talk, not about our books, but about ourselves. Gone are the days when the books spoke for themselves, and writers could, well, write. Now we talk about our personal lives, our hopes and fears, and share intimacies, all in the name of building a community.

It’s true, there are lots and lots of books out there, and it’s almost impossible, without a big, moneyed machine behind you, to be heard above the noise. How on earth will I get you to read my book? How will I get you to read this blog post, and then, maybe, look at the book?

The truth is that I don’t know. But I am part of the new world order, so I too have learned to share. In fact, there’s a beautiful post about growing up in Mexico today in Arleen William’s Finding Home series. Please read it, and love it and share it! There’s also and interview with me at Indie Book Promo, where I disclose the secrets to writing…among other things.

Do come and share my writing life with me. It’s all part of living today, so join me on line, and let’s live together. Claudia

Coming out Jewish on Passover

And the best matzo brei recipe ever…

In 1967 I came out Jewish with matzo brei. I was twelve when I first tasted the delicacy. Why so late, you may well ask. There’s a reason.

I grew up in Mexico City, and although I always knew at some level that we were Jewish, we just didn’t talk about it. In fact, we never mentioned religion at all. We could talk about sex, politics were on the table every night, books, music, all were fair game, but we danced around the “religion” topic at home and outside. I attended Catholic church with my friends and was never the least bit uncomfortable doing so. I crossed myself, learned all the prayers, and happily went along for the ride. I never thought I was really Catholic. I was just, well, there. Children are pretty flexible that way.

When I was eleven we moved back to the United States permanently. That was 49 years ago, and World War II wasn’t the distant memory that it is now. The soldiers returning from battle and the survivors of the horrors of Nazi cruelties didn’t know the term PTSD, or that it could last for more than twenty years. The reverberations of my father’s wartime service in the US Army and my mother’s trauma as a Holocaust survivor, one of the few in her large extended family to live through it, suddenly became important. I was also a little older, and realized that the reasons we didn’t talk about “it” were pretty darned serious. The duality stopped being quite so easy.

The area we moved to was predominantly Catholic, and I continued to play along. Some of my classmates were Jewish and were teased, not kindly, for it. As a new kid, awkward, semi-foreign and younger than my class, I wasn’t about to join that club.

And so it was the first Spring that we were in the States, when I was 12, that I tried actual matzo for the first time. Perhaps I had eaten it before but I simply didn’t remember. If so, I had to have been very young, and a dry cracker doesn’t exactly stay with you in memory. My father said, “Don’t take this outside. Eat it here.” The scars were still fresh.

But one rainy morning he made breakfast for us, which in itself was a little unusual. In those days my father worked 14 hour days and never touched a pot or pan, but here was something he was going to do.

He took matzos and broke them into a bowl. He ran the hot water from the tap over them and left them to soak while he beat eggs in another bowl with a splash of water from the matzo bowl and a shake of salt. Once he decided the matzos were soft enough he poured off the water and squeezed them out, and added them to the egg mixture. He mushed them around until all the egg was absorbed. Then he melted butter in a pan and poured the egg-matzo mixture into the hot butter. He let it sit a bit, then broke it up with a spatula and turned it a few times until it was no longer “eggy.”

“Get plates.” We got out plates, and then a miracle happened: he took out the sugar bowl and a spoon and began to sprinkle our portions with prohibited amounts of sugar. What joy to three kids being brought up to eat “healthily” well before the health-food crazes!

To this day, that’s how I make matzo brei, though I don’t pour sugar on, I just sprinkle it. It’s the bread of freedom, maybe still a bit under cover, but freedom to be Jewish. With sugar.

Did you expect the Spanish Inquisition?

Ah, the deathless #MontyPython line! Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisitionnnnn! But in Mexico in the 1600-1700s they most certainly did. I had the great honor of addressing the conference The Golden Age of Jewish Spain, sponsored by the Coalition on Ladino Legacy in Los Angeles this past Sunday, February 8. I was in some pretty spectacular company. My topic will be the Conversos and Crypto-Jews in the Shadow of the Inquisition (Mexico, 1690-1711), but will be focused on literature, rather than history.

The conference was sold out! (Maybe because there were tapas and Flamenco dancers…) So here I’ll share some of my talk, for those who didn’t make it to LA on Sunday. Enjoy!

THE SECRET JEWS OF MEXICO 1500-1700

My perspective is that of the writer, who looks to history for inspiration. My books, Josefina’s Sin and The Duel for Consuelo, are historical fiction set in 1690 and 1711 Mexico. I do my research, of course. I study the history of the time, but history is the story mostly of men, of the powerful and famous. Fiction lives in the interstices between the facts as known or believed to be true by historians.

My books are the stories of women, and in The Duel for Consuelo, the story especially of women caught in the web of the Inquisition for being Crypto-Jews.

Being a Jew in Spain in the 1400s was a very risky thing to be. Being a Jew in Spain after 1492 was deadly. And being a Jew openly in Mexico in 1690 was insanity.

Conversos (converted to Christianity at the point of the sword) and their descendants were fiercely persecuted. Any hint of Judaizing, or secretly practicing their old religion, was ruthlessly ferreted out by the Inquisition, which led Conversos to the practice of haciendo sábado, or “doing the Sabbath.” This involved ostentatiously working on Saturday so the neighbors could see them, eating pork in public, and putting on other displays of Christianity. Nonetheless, many continued their Jewish practices in secret.

If they were “lucky” they converted and eventually got out. As we have heard, some went to the New World, including Mexico and Peru. Even there, the Inquisition had full power. In fact for personnel reasons including the lack of supervisory man-power in the hierachy on site, to use the modern language of Human Resources, the original priests who went to the Colonies had full inquisitorial powers.

Mexico was something of a haven for the secret Jews, or Crypto-Jews at first. With so much novelty there was less time to spend ferreting out Jews, and more emphasis on political alignment. In the 1520s, Hernando Alonso was burned at the stake as a Crypto-Jew, but his main fault was being a supporter of Hernan Cortés. As the Inquisition’s order was Dominican, and that order opposed Cortés politically, Alonso was targeted for his vehement support of the wrong side. Diego de Ocaña, on the other hand, also convicted by the Inquisition for Judaizing, was an open supporter of the King (and therefore anti-Cortés) and so only his goods were confiscated and he was exiled back to Spain. He returned to Mexico eventually and became a notary, an honored position in local government.

In the latter part of the 1500s and the early 1600s Portugal became more adamant in its persecution of its own Crypto-Jews, and those fled to the slightly more hospitable Spain, and from there to Mexico. Because Portugal had previously been more tolerant, those Jews had far more knowledge of their traditions and Hebrew prayers than the Spanish-decent Jews, so upon their arrival in Mexico they brought new life and knowledge to those who had long lost their ways.

They also brought the attention of the Inquisition to these new arrivals, along with a flurry of prosecutions of Portuguese-descent possible or actual Jews. However, their arrival coincided with a major expansion of the Mexican economy, and the Inquisition moved on to other concerns: bigamy, witchcraft and blasphemy.

All that changed in 1642. The Portuguese were at war with Spain, and Portuguese Crypto-Jews were suspected of conspiracy. Hundreds were persecuted in Mexico, the estates of those convicted were confiscated and a few were burned at the stake. The Bishop of Puebla declared the Secret Jews of Portuguese origins to be a big risk to Mexico. As he then became the Archbishop of Mexico and subsequently the Viceroy, his edict against the Portuguese Conversos brought an end to the relatively safe lives of the Crypto-Jews.

One of the ways that Crypto-Jews were “caught” was through denunciation by family servants. Clues to Judaizing included reports of special dishes being prepared on Friday before sunset, to be kept warm on banked coals through Saturday, or preparation of meats involving draining all of the blood from the meat before cooking. Even cleaning the house on Friday, or bathing by women on Friday before sunset, all could lead to a denunciation. The meticulous records kept by the Inquisition are a fertile source for recipes and housekeeping customs for Crypto-Jews of the era.

After 1650, the presence of Crypto-Jews essentially withered in Mexico. Where there had once been an extensive system of safe houses and patronage, these broke up and the remaining Judaizers were on their own. Their practices became more and more individualized, morphing into strange offshoots of traditions. They lit candles behind heavy drapery, observed the Sabbath covertly on Saturday, and attended Mass on Sunday. Many acquired a taste for pork.

Some Jews only knew one blessing, many knew no Hebrew at all. Knowledge was passed down in the family, sort of in a telephone game, and with each generation the practices became more idiosyncratic, further and further removed from their origins. Tortillas and chocolate replaced matzo and wine during Passover. Some believed that the Messiah would come in their time, to Mexico. Burial practices, such as adding a pillow of dirt to the coffin replaced a burial in virgin soil. Fasting on particular dates following a death, such as the eighth or thirtieth day, replaced the traditional periods of Jewish mourning. These were examples both of adaptation to the New World and a loss of understanding of the actual rituals and traditions.

Josefina’s Sin is set in Mexico in 1689. Lured by the imagined grandeur and adventure of the viceroyal court, Josefina, a sheltered landowner’s wife, accepts an invitation to the Marquesa’s court, to mingle with the cultural elite. What she finds is an overwhelming and complicated world within a world, with its own rules, etiquette, backbiting and gossip. And its temptations, passions and treacherous passages.

Amidst this drama Josefina finds herself drawn to the nuns who study and write poetry at the risk of persecution by the Spanish inquisition. As I noted, the Inquisition had other fish to fry, if you’ll excuse the pun, besides Jews. Intellectuals, women who exceeded the boundaries set for them, any hint of lack of orthodoxy, was red meat for them. Josefina meets one nun in particular, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, who teaches Josefina about poetry, power, and the nature and consequences of love, all in the shadow of the Holy Office.

I’ve been secretly in love with Sor Juana since my undergraduate days. I wrote my senior thesis on The Feminism of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz (it was the 70s) and I was fascinated by a nun in the late 1600s who challenged a bishop, asserted women’s rights to study and learn, and who at the end was forced to renounce her beliefs and sign her confession in her own blood.

Near the beginning of the book is a passage that I will read to you, where Josefina first encounters poetry. She encounters a strange man in the market place, and he reads a poem from Joseph, son of Eli, and Moises, son of Habib. These are two Jewish poets from the late 1400s, and are found collected in The Dream of the Poem.

Josefina’s infatuation with poetry is launched by this Jewish poet, and by the poetry of the Songs of Solomon.

I explore the theme of the Crypto Jews of Mexico in the next book. The Duel for Consuelo picks up the thread at this point, with a woman who knows only the Sabbath blessing for the candles, and whose grandmother said it with such a ferocious Mexican accent that she was spared by the Inquisition.

RESOURCES

Secrecy and Deceit: The Religion of the Crypto-Jews. David M. Gitlitz, University of New Mexico Press, 1996, 2002.

To the End of the Earth: A history of the Crypto-Jews of New Mexico. Stanley M Hordes, Columbia University Press, 2005.

A Taste of Honey. David M. Gitliz and Linda Kay Davidson, St. Martins Griffin

http://vanorabennett.com/blog/how-the-inquisition-found-secret-jews-in-spain-by-sniffing-their-kitchen-smells-and-rooting-through-their-garbage/

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/Marranos.html

http://forward.com/articles/9216/in-spain-inquisitors-tracked-conversos-by-their-fo/

http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com/2009/12/tex-mex-jewish-food-traditions.html

 

Adapting and Assimilating: the brilliant photos of Judah Passow

photo 1

Last night I had the incredible pleasure of visiting an exhibit of photos by Judah Passow, featured in a photography exhibit at the Jewish Community Center of San Francisco. The exhibit, entitled Scots Jews, gave us a glimpse into the lives of the tiny Jewish population of Scotland. In fact, when my Scottish friend asked me to go to the exhibit, I said, “What? Did they photograph all three of them?” There are about 5500 Jews in Scotland. It’s a pretty small country, population 5,295,000 all in all, so this tiny group represents about 0.1%. About the same number as in a single block in Brooklyn…

What thrilled me the most were the pictures from Burns Night. Burns Nights in Scotland are these wild holidays where people follow a ritual, reading from Robert Burns’ poetry and drinking whisky. (Yes, in Scotland there’s no e in whisky!) So here the haggis, part of the ritual food, is “piped in” by bagpipers in grand ceremony. But the Burns Night is being held in the L’Chaim Restaurant, Glasgow, the only kosher restaurant in Scotland (per the exhibit) and the haggis itself is kosher!

Jews rarely have had a homeland. The population, spread through the world, can only maintain its religion and traditions through insulation. And yet, throughout history, Jews have adapted without assimilating–taken the foods and customs of the “host” nation and incorporating them, or using them when traditional foods were unavailable–while not giving up or losing their own identity, religion and customs.

Sometimes the “host” country returns the favor. In the US, where we have a large Jewish population and an unheard of level of freedom, bagels have certainly gone mainstream and everyone is invited to the Bar Mitzvah. But in times of fear and oppression, Jews who have hidden their identity have had to make do with what was on offer. The Crypto-Jews of Mexico, in the 1600s, used tortillas instead of matzo, and hot chocolate instead of wine, but the traditions and religion retained their secret existence for centuries.

Today’s Tablet Magazine featured a post with a Halloween candy-stuffed Challah for Friday, both Shabbat and Halloween. Some traditionalists were outraged. Me, not so much. How much of our culture is adapted, and not static? Do we freeze our traditions in Eastern Europe circa 1800? Weren’t plenty of those customs adapted to foods available in Germany or Poland?

Granted Halloween has deeply Christian origins, but anyone can put on a witch hat or a Ninja Turtles costume and go door to door for candy. Why not enjoy a little sweetness at home?  And pipe in that Kosher Haggis!

Full moon, new inspiration

Supermoon August 2014
Supermoon August 2014

Supermoon August 2014

The giant moon (no, I know, it just seems bigger due to some scientific explanation…) rose as we watched from 8200 feet, at the #SquawValley ski resort. Its bright light brought clarity to my #inspiration for the next book. Long swirling in my mind, like the clouds in the picture, the story burst through, like the light of the full moon last night. Yes, the clouds moved back in (block that metaphor! as it used to say in the New Yorker) but that light is there. I know what the next book will be about! And soon, so will you!

It’s Here! The Duel for Consuelo is up and ready!

The Duel for Consuelo is up and ready for you to buy, enjoy, review, talk about, share! I’m too excited to do a long post today, but I am beyond excited! You can get it on Amazon, Barnesandnoble.com, and you can walk into your local bookstore and ask them to order it for you. Really. Even e-books. Did you know that? Of course you did!

While you’re at it, I am the guest blogger on the brilliant Jessica Knauss, Famous Author blog. You will find the fascinating story of the town of Matajudios, (or Kill Jews, really! That’s the name of the Spanish town!) See its history, find out why it took 1000 years to change it. http://jessicaknauss.blogspot.com

So come and read my book, and while you’re waiting for your book to arrive, check out Jessica Knauss, Famous Author!

#Love #Duty #Faith & the Inquisition. THE DUEL FOR CONSUELO is now available! amzn.to/1oAC8j6 #WeNeedDiverseBooks #theduelforconsuelo

 

“As heart rending as it is pulse pounding” THE DUEL FOR CONSUELO is up now! amzn.to/1oAC8j6 #WeNeedDiverseBooks #theduelforconsuelo

Looking for something out of the ordinary?

This is an ode to the unusual! Much as we all love the tried-and-true #regencyromances, and the #dystopian #zombie #newbooks, there are some unusual stories being written out there that are worth stepping out of our usual rut for. The #WeNeedDiverseBooks movement captures those stories about places we don’t usually see in current literature, or books by writers who are a bit more diverse than the usual crowd.

The #WeNeedDiverseBooks blog relay allows us to do just that. So with great thanks to Ekaterine Xia www.ekaterinexia.com, aspiring world tyrant and dominatrix , who “tagged” me to be the next diverse blogger, here I go!

Q: What are you working on?

A: My new book, The Duel for Consuelo, comes out in 4 weeks! So I am working on the final touches on my big announcement. And then, I will be working on the next book in the Castillo family series… more on that another day!

Q: How does your work differ from others of its genre?

A: Can you name another book about Colonial Mexico in 1690-1720? I didn’t think so. Historical fiction tends to cling to England from 1700-1924. There are a few brave souls who write about the same time frame in America. To dip into Mexico, at that mysterious time before the Industrial Revolution, when Mexico was still ruled by distant Spain and its local Viceroy, is really out of the ordinary.

Q: Why do you write what you do?

A: I grew up in Mexico City, and fell in love with the famous poetess of the late 1600s, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz when I was a young feminist in college, so my fascination couldn’t help but lead to my first main-stream fiction novel, Josefina’s Sin (Atria/Simon & Schuster 2011.) As the Enlightenment crept in illuminating the darkest corners of Spain and eventually Mexico, the Inquisition’s targets, Jews and Spaniards of Jewish blood, were absorbed more and more into the mainstream. But they never completely disappeared, guarding their secrets and identity in the face of certain death. That’s the core of The Duel for Consuelo.

Q: How does your writing process work?

A: It’s very strange. I think, and think, and think. I research and think some more. I scribble an outline. I refine it and think. I walk and think. And then, by miracle, all at once, I sit down and write for a couple of months!

Interested in seeing more about my books? Click on the tabs above for my website, and for the books themselves! Sign up to get updates, and be the first to read The Duel for Consuelo!

Next week, be sure to visit the blogs of the next three bloggers in the relay:

Sandra Ramos O’Briant, www.bloodmother.com , is the amazing author of the Sandoval Sisters’ Secret of Old Blood. It is a riveting story of New Mexico, harrowing and beautiful, a book like no other!

Eleanor Parker Sapia, Latina Author, www.elliesbookz.wordpress.com, writes of Puerto Rico. Her eagerly awaited debut novel of a midwife in Puerto Rico, A Decent Woman, comes out this summer.

Lisa J. Yarde writes fiction inspired by the Middle Ages in Europe. She is the author of six historical novels, which take place during Europe’s medieval period, including two works set in England and France, and a series about the last Muslim rulers of Spain.
Her novel Sultana: The Bride Price takes place in fourteenth-century Moorish Spain.
thebrooklynscribbler.blogspot.com/

Happy Diverse Reading!

The Enlightenment Creeps In

It’s true! I have a publication date for THE DUEL FOR CONSUELO. It comes out on June 15 with Booktrope, and I am beyond excited. CONSUELO is the story of a woman torn between love and duty, the old religion and new survival, two men, two worlds. It will take you back to 1711, in Colonial Mexico.

In 1711 the Inquisition’s reach and power was fading. The Spanish king, starved for cash after fighting wars on two fronts, no longer had the funds to chase “infidels.” The ripe pickings of the Jewish lands and fortunes had long ago been plundered, and the time and effort it took to search out false Christians brought too little return. The Inquisition, or the Holy Office, was a Church function, of course, but without the king’s support its power was severely diminished.

In the rest of Europe the tendrils of the Enlightenment were creeping in, and even Spain couldn’t hold off the light much longer. Far away, in Colonial Mexico, the effects of this change were somewhat conflicted. On the one hand, the distance had made it harder to keep the colonies in line, and mainstream thinking took on a regional flavor all its own. But on the other, the creollos oft-times wanted to be more Spanish than the Spanish, so they kept with their intrenched views while Europe progressed.

That’s the world Consuelo inhabits.  Join me soon for the whole story!